Dyspraxia

Dyspraxia is a common form of developmental coordination disorder (DCD). It affects fine and/or gross motor coordination in children and adults. It may also affect speech. Verbal dyspraxia is also known as apraxia.

Nobody knows for sure what causes dyspraxia. Although little research has been conducted, there is no evidence, for now, to suggest that brain damage is involved in the condition. Scientists assume it might be related to immaturity of neurone development.

Dyspraxia has negative consequences on almost every aspect of the affected individual’s life – education, work, daily chores and recreation. A child with dyspraxia may have troubles dressing themselves, writing their homework or riding a bike. An adult with dyspraxia may never learn how to drive a car. People with this disorder may also have problems with organization and time management. Their other non-motor difficulties might be related to memory, perception and processing. Dyspraxia is often found together with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD), dyslexia, language disorders and social, emotional and behavioral impairments.

BELLOW YOU WILL FIND MORE PRACTICAL EXAMPLES OF HOW DYSPRAXIA MAY AFFECT A PERSON’S LIFE SINCE CHILDHOOD. THE EARLIER A CHILD RECEIVES THE DIAGNOSIS, THE BETTER CHANCES TO HELP THEM IMPROVE THEIR PERFORMANCE AT SCHOOL AND IN EVERYDAY LIFE.

  1. Babies and toddlers with dyspraxia are late in reaching milestones (rolling over, sitting, standing, walking, and speaking).
  2.  A little child with dyspraxia may not be able to run, hop, jump, catch or kick a ball like their peers do.
  3.  Dyspraxia may prevent children from having a normal social life – they may not know how to behave in company and how to keep friends.
  4. A dyspraxic child might have difficulties understanding concepts such as ‘in’, ‘on’, ‘in front of’, etc.
  5. Children with dyspraxia are slow and hesitant in most actions. They fall over frequently and have difficulty in walking up and down stairs. They are also poor at dressing.
  6. A dyspraxic child cannot do jigsaws or shape sorting games and appears not to be able to learn anything instinctively but must be taught each one of the skills he has.
  7. A student with dyspraxia has poor pencil grip, writes with difficulty and struggles when having to copy from the blackboard
  8. Dyspraxic children are poorly organized, find it very difficult to remember and /or follow instructions. They may have trouble with maths and writing structured stories.
  9. Students with dyspraxia dislike Physical Education at school and avoid games.

MOST IMPORTANTLY:

There are many specialized exercises that may help people with dyspraxia improve their quality of life. Early recognition of dyspraxia will enable early intervention and practical steps to help your child to achieve their potential.

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT DEVELOPMENTAL PROBLEMS

BONITATIS site does not intend to provide neither a comprehensive view on all developmental disorders, nor detailed information about every one of them. It does aim, though, at letting the public know about the newest and not widely known yet but very effective shared therapies and treatments for those disorders. Moreover, BONITATIS aspires to make them available to Bulgarian children.

WHY SHARED THERAPIES AND TREATMENTS?

It is no news that Autism, Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD), Dyslexia and Dyspraxia considerably overlap. Approximately half of the dyslectic children are dyspraxic too and about 30% of children diagnosed with ADHD have dyslexia. Many autistic children are hyperactive and have dyspraxia and dyslexia. A good number of children, diagnosed earlier with ADHD, after a year or two, receive the diagnosis of autism.
No doubt, more research must be done, but there is enough evidence, by now, that almost all the children with the above-mentioned conditions share similar learning difficulties and at least two serious physical problems – digestive abnormalities and neuro-developmental delay. It is beyond the scope of BONITATIS to join the discussion whether the latter are part of the cause of the disorders or their co morbidities. The important thing to have in mind is that the children with all these disorders get better on an appropriate nutritional protocol and a specialized exercise program, aimed at overcoming the neuro-developmental delay. BONITATIS strongly supports the combination of both strategies as part of an even more holistic approach.

Contact Us

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Not readable? Change text.

Start typing and press Enter to search